Tag Archives: Outdoor places in Paris

Marchés de Noël

Happy New Year everyone! I hope everyone had a nice holiday season. As you may have noticed, I took a break from blogging and went back to the US to be with friends and family for the holidays. It was a wonderful trip, although it was strange to be speaking so much English at first! I came back to Paris just in time for New Year’s and celebrated at the Eiffel Tower with friends (it was a bit chaotic and very anticlimactic).

This week I moved into a new apartment. I crossed the Seine into the right bank. I will miss my old neighborhood in the 6th arrondissement, but it’s just a short walk from my new apartment. Besides, I’m looking forward to exploring a new neighborhood here for a while.

Being in Paris in December was fun. All of the bars, cafés, restaurants, and shops put up garland and ornaments and lights. Many streets had lights strung up over the street between the buildings. It was pretty and festive.

One of the many things they do in Paris at Christmas is the Marchés de Noël (Christmas markets). There are many in the Paris area, but the biggest and most

Lots and lots of chocolate

famous one is on the Champs-Élysées. White wooden stalls line the streets selling gifts and treats. They have roasted chestnuts, mulled wine,  and candied nuts to snack on while you look at the chocolate, cheese, meats, toys, and scarves in other stalls. It’s fun to walk and look at all the stalls and lights while snacking.  The Champs-Élysées is chaos, but it’s worth seeing. I prefer the smaller markets though. They’re not so packed and you can easily walk through them.

Cimetière du Père-Lachaise

Last Friday, the weather was beautiful. Actually, come to think of it, the weather has been perfect for a couple of weeks now. Anyway, my fellow foreigners and I went to our morning class and then had lunch as usual. After lunch, we came back for our afternoon oral language class, and the teacher announced that the copy machines were all broken and it was beautiful outside, so we were going to the Père Lachaise cemetery. We were all happy to be outside in the sunshine.

The cemetery is vast, and it is full of graves of Paris’s elite. It is still used as a cemetery today, but only the really rich or famous can be buried there. It is very hilly with cobblestones everywhere, so if you’re planning a trip you should wear comfortable shoes (I speak from experience; since this was an unplanned impromptu trip, I was wearing heals and it made the trip less pleasant). Since I didn’t know we were going on the trip, I not only wore uncomfortable shoes, but I also didn’t bring my camera. Sorry for the lack of photos in this post. I’ll make up for it in upcoming posts.

We visited the graves of Édith Piaf, Marcel Proust, Frédéric Chopin (who was not French, but Polish), Molière, Oscar Wilde (who’s grave was covered in red lipstick kisses and notes written in red lipstick in spite of a sign forbidding it—the French don’t really follow rules that conflict with tradition), and Jim Morrison.

Jim Morrison’s grave is closed off because people would go smoke on it. I don’t think that was a huge issue initially, but then people started writing on the nearby graves, which is disrespectful. There were actually a few nearby graves where people had written “I <3 Jim” and things like that. Who does that? Who writes on someone’s grave about someone else? I was disturbed.

When we visited, around 2pm on a Friday afternoon, there was a group of Americans sitting on a grave near Jim Morrison’s and drinking and listening to music and jumping onto other graves to take pictures. Out of our class, I’m the only American, and I was so embarrassed by them. I said, in French (partly because I didn’t want them to know that I was American), “those are not my compatriots,” and my teacher responded “Ce n’est pas à toi,” (“it’s not for you,” literally, but in this context it was more like “it’s not your fault”). When one guy jumped onto a grave, my teacher said to them “this is someone’s grave” in French. The guy who had jumped on the grave was sarcastic in responding “pas Jim Morrison’s grave.” Then the teacher said, in English, “Yes, but someone else is buried here, this is not a bar, it’s a cemetery.” Then the offenders just nodded and said “you’re right,” and kept drinking. It was disgusting. The French are generally tolerant of crazy partying, as far as I’ve been able to tell. But jumping on graves and listening to music and drinking on someone’s grave in a cemetery is just downright disrespectful. Maybe if they were on Jim Morrison’s grave, it would be okay, but they were on some random person’s grave nearby. The whole thing was weird, and I think everyone who came to visit the grave was put-off by them.

Other than the awkward exchange with the rude Americans, the cemetery was beautiful. It was very peaceful and FULL of famous people’s graves. We could have stayed all day and enjoyed the lovely weather and seen the graves of many other incredibly famous people (I wanted to see the graves of Georges Bizet, Francis Poulenc, and Gertrude Stein), but it was such a massive place and we were all hot and tired by the end of our long walk.

If you’re looking for a good walk on a nice day with interesting and historical scenery, come here. Overall, it’s very peaceful and beautiful.

Jardin du Luxembourg

This morning I went for a run in the Luxembourg garden. It was fantastic. Anyone who knows me knows that I am not a runner. At all. However, I plan to eat a lot of baguettes, cheese, and crème brûlée in the next couple of years (I’ve already gotten off to a great start!), and I figure I should pre-empt the calories while I still can.

The garden and palace were begun in 1611 for Marie de Médicis, the widow of Henry IV. There is a large palace and massive grounds. Today, the palace houses the Sénat (one of the legislative houses of the government).

Luxembourg Palace

Even though the weather today was chilly, the sun was out and so were the Parisians. There were garden chairs all over the grounds, and people were sitting and relaxing and enjoying the sun. There was a fountain where kids drove small remote-controlled sailboats (some simple, some very elaborate).

Fountain with Sailboats

The gardens were filled with people. There were many joggers going all around the sand path that circumnavigates the grounds, and I joined the ranks this morning. There were also at least 4 groups I saw doing doing t’ai chi, some jugglers practicing, and people stretching and doing sit-ups. There is a huge playground where it seemed like a thousand kids were running around, shrieking, swinging on the swings, climbing on the playset, and having a great time. There was also a large area where many adults (mostly men, but I saw at least one woman) were playing pétanque, which looked a lot like bocci ball. There were some tennis courts, and apparently chess is played there as well, although I didn’t see it.

Bee Hives

There is also an area with several bee hives where they have a beekeeping school. Once the honey is harvested, they sell it in the garden. I plan to purchase some once that happens. The bee houses originated long ago but were removed. They were recently added again, and would-be beekeepers can once again learn the skill right here in Paris.

The gardens themselves are magnificent. I’m no horticulturist, but the flowers and fruits are beautiful. They grow more varieties of pears than I have ever seen, and each type is carefully labeled. Oh yeah, and for some reason they grow some of the fruit in bags. I haven’t figured that one out.

Apples

Pears

Palace and Garden

This was a beautiful place to start the day.